Foodservice Equipment Reports Fortnightly
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Welcome to FER Fortnightly Online Newsletter
November 3, 2009








Economic Report:
Sponsored by:
Integrated Control Corp.
FER's E&S Forecast Webinar Reslated To Nov. 18
NPD Reports Restaurant Traffic Fell 3.6% During Summer
NRA's September Performance Index Moves Lower Again
Technomic: Bleeding At Full-Service Ops Slowed In September

Industry Report:
Sponsored by:
Server Products
Pizza Hut Heats Up In U.K.
CR&HG Buys 10-Unit Millie's Chain
NRA's Web Site Offers Info On H1N1
NRA Offers Early-Bird Pricing For May Show



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In This Section:
ICC Gas-Code Change Extends Permit Time
Smaller Disposer Drains Okay Under Code Change
Colorado Cuts Minimum Wage

This issue's Economic ReportSponsor: Integrated Control Corp. 
Industry Report Sponsor: Server Products 
Regulatory Report Manitowoc Foodservice

ICC Gas-Code Change Extends Permit Time
The Int'l. Code Council has decided to give developers and builders a break when it comes to time allotted for permits for fuel-gas systems.

Until recently, the Int'l. Fuel Gas Code only provided for a six-month permit to finish construction of fuel gas systems. Now, the ICC change allows a local code official to extend that to 12 months and protects the contractor in the event the IFGC passes a more stringent code or even a simple update during the construction period.

The ICC recognized that particularly with large projects such as resort properties, construction often can take longer than a year. Which was problematic with six-month permits for fuel-gas systems.

The code change is in the IFGC's Section 106.5.7. You can get a quick summary at http://media.iccsafe.org/news/eNews/2009v6n15/codeupdate-ifgc.pdf. Or go to www.iccsafe.org to order a copy of the code.

 

Section sponsored by Manitowoc Foodservice

Smaller Disposer Drains Okay Under Code Change
With more municipalities mandating disposers, many operators have found themselves installing more disposer than they really need. For commercial operations, most local plumbing codes follow the Int'l. Code Council's standard for a 2" drain to handle the waste. So most commercial disposers have a 2" throat to match code.

A lot of operations, however, don't generate that much food waste, so don't need that big a disposer. Fortunately, the ICC has seen fit to revise its plumbing code to reflect the use of smaller disposers in many foodservice applications. Commercial disposers now must be connected to a drain not less than 1 1/2" (38 mm) in diameter. A summary is available online at http://media.iccsafe.org/news/eNews/2009v6n14/codeupdate2009v6n14.pdf.

For more information, visit ICC at www.iccsafe.org.


Section sponsored by Manitowoc Foodservice

Colorado Cuts Minimum Wage
Colorado's minimum-wage workers will take a pay cut starting Jan. 1. Colorado, one of ten states that tie minimum wage to the cost of living, recently adjusted its minimum wage downward by four cents an hour based on decreases in the cost of living in Colorado.

Despite a falling consumer price index elsewhere, other states are holding their minimum wages steady.

Colorado voters approved an adjustable minimum wage in 2006. Though proponents didn't intend for wages to decrease, the law says the state can do so. The minimum wage was lowered to $7.24 an hour from $7.28 based on a 0.6% decline in the CPI through August. Since the federal minimum wage is now $7.25 an hour, however, most employees paid minimum wage will earn only three cents an hour less, not four.

The state Department of Labor and Employment must hold public hearings this month on the wage change, but the drop looks certain. Three cents an hour may be pennies, but no doubt many foodservice operators will feel a little relief.



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