Anatomy Of A Pastry Station

Established in 1995 by award-winning founders Chef Jacquy Pfeiffer and Chef Sébastien Canonne, MOF, the French Pastry School, Chicago, is the only major culinary school in North America dedicated to pastry, baking, and confectionary arts. FPS has three full-time programs: Pastry and Baking, covering the entire range of expertise; Cake, focusing on celebration cakes and decorating; and Bread, which is a deep dive into artisan bread baking. “The Pastry Arts are very equipment-intense,” says Chef Pfeiffer. “They cover pastry, cakes, jams, bread, cookies, chocolate work, candy, sugar sculpture, ice cream and gelato, and more—all of which require very special tools.” While you might not need a marble top to work on (butcher block and stainless work surfaces are just fine—and less expensive), you will need climate control for quality results. “Unless you can maintain a room temperature ideally between 67°F-70°F, items won’t set up properly,” he says. Butterfat, chocolate and fondant melt at 98°F, so you’ll have to rethink setting up a pastry station in a 100°F kitchen.

 

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